Monday Missive – June 19, 2017

Quotes

The camera is an excuse to be someplace you otherwise don’t belong. It gives me both a point of connection and a point of separation.” — Susan Meiselas

We are making photographs to understand what our lives mean to us.” — Ralph Hattersley

What I have learnt and what I teach now is all about experimentation and learning to pick yourself up and try again when you fall down.” – Lara Jade

Links

– The new Apple file system
– Photoshop techniques you should know
– Field macro studio
– Color Lookup tables in Photoshop
– Removing tattoos
– Personal Projects
– Photography in Yucatan Mexico: ruins and wildlife
– Retouching hair in Photoshop
– How to Geo-tag your photos
– Social media

Young woman walking at Sandy Point State Park.

Monday Missive — June 5, 2017

Quotes

If you try to corral or cage the photographic process, it will thumb it’s nose at you. The trick is just to flow with it and stop it when a moment of discovery has met inspiration.” — Paul Caponigro

A good snapshot stops a moment from running away.” – Eudora Welty

Photography is a language more universal than words.” – Minor White

Links

– Macro at 1:1 and beyond
– Falls of the Columbia River gorge
– Details and grand landscapes
– Colorizing Historic BW photos Shared by Kay. This isn’t a “how to” but looks at the work involved to be accurate and the implications. Interesting video.
– Art of Photography Assignment 7: Motion
– Safety tips for travel
– Quick tips
– Finding critics
– Consider the frame

Another approach to an image posted on Feb. 27, 2017 ( http://richeskinphoto.com/blog/?p=1991). Compare and comment. Which do you prefer and why?

Bayscaping (Butterfly Garden) Redux

To me, photography is an art of observation. It’s about finding something interesting in an ordinary place…. I’ve found it has little to do with the things you see and everything to do with the way you see them.  — Elliott Erwitt

I first talked about Bayscaping — landscaping for habitat using native species — in April 2013, with an update in August of that year.  Well the garden has come along with fairly robust stands of Joe Pye Weed, Swamp Milkweed and butterfly weed and others which should attract numerous insects.  [Last year I mostly got a huge crop of aphids.]

Two years ago I saw 8 monarch caterpillars, but last year — nothing; very disappointing, but there was national concern about a huge kill of monarchs due to bad weather at the wrong time.  Hopefully this year will be better.  So far just some red and black milkweed bugs, that were not photographed.

Because I enjoy macro photography, my original intent in starting the garden was two-fold:  Provide a convenient (right outside my backdoor) location for macro photography of flowers and bugs and eventually to teach a macro class out of my home studio. So to start using it productively, I plan to update this blog post approximately weekly with at least 1 image per week (yeah, I know, not terribly ambitious, but hey, its summer and I’m retired).

May 29, 2015, mid-afternoon

ButterflyWeed_DSC4817

D200, 55 mm micro-Nikkor with 1.4x Tamron Teleconverter, f/5.6, 1/640 sec, ISO400. Butterfly weed.

MilkweedLeafBeetle_DSC4824

Milkweed Leaf Beetle, D200, 55 micro-Nikkor w/1.4X Tamron telextender, f/8, 1/125, ISO 400

Pretty warm, didn’t see too much, mostly those gold-bodied flies, so I shot some butterfly weed buds. Went back out an hour later and found this gaudy milkweed leaf beetle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 1, 2015, mid-afternoon

Experimented with a used 55 mm micro-Nikkor I bought earlier this year with a 52.5 mm Nikon extension tube (PN-11) that may have been made specifically to achieve 1:1 with this lens.  The tubes have their own foot, increasing the stability of the camera/lens on the tripod.

June 10, 2015D800E, ISO 400, f/16, 55 mm micro with 52.5 extension tubes.

Butterflyweed has opened.

ButterflyWeed_D8E1343

55 mm micro-Nikkor with 14 mm extension tube on D800E

 

BayScaping

“BayScaping” is the local (Maryland) term for natural landscaping that uses native plants and specifically provides habitat and food for wildlife. There are numerous advantages generally including lower maintenance and high success, since the native plants are better adapted to the local environment.

I have just completed digging out 400 square feet of old forsythia to make room for plants that will attract wildlife including:  columbine, milkweed, butterflyweed, Joe Pye weed, coneflower and goldenrod.

This project addresses both my conservation concerns and, hopefully in the future, will provide numerous photographic opportunities for macro subjects and small wildlife, as well as the potential for teaching small classes on closeup and macro photography from home.  I did not think ahead to photograph the starting point with really over grown forsythia, but will try to document my progress, successes and failures moving forward.

As we develop more and more land, plant more lawns and lay down more asphalt for roads, it is increasingly necessary for those who care to at least make an effort to provide pockets of natural habitat in support of wildlife.